Categories
Uncategorized

Research paper topic is how are high technology devices affecting

Part I–What I Already Know About My Topic  Here is where you write at least one or two paragraphs (or longer as you study your motives), discussing what knowledge, experience, or background you already have about your topic, BEFORE having done any research on it.    Part II–What I Want to Find Out  You put down one or two paragraphs’ (or more) worth of questions about your topic, questions you want badly, even desperately, to have answered. These questions will lead you to those sources that will answer your questions. These questions are the passionate, fiery fuel that guide you through the morass of library work, interviews, lengthy bus rides or freeways drives, etc. You may use “I” and your opinion. How are high technology devices affecting students ability to focus Part III–The Search  You’ll read at least 5 magazine/journal articles and 2 books (chapters OK). This is, in essence, the body of your paper. Not only do you report on what others have said about your topic, you must document that carefully using MLA style. The “I” in I-Search means that you must write in the first person, and you must be an interactive, reactive participant in the I-Search writing process. This part of the paper is the bulk of your paper and should be the longest. There are no length limits, but you should have a minimum of 6 pages. Every paragraph in Part III needs at least one citation. You can NOT  use your opinion in this section.   Part IV–What I Learned  This is where you reflect upon the entire search experience, not only what you got out of it and not only what you’ve learned (outside of the research), but how this search has changed your life. It can be as short as one to two paragraphs in length or as long as you feel you need, and summarizes your quest for the holy grail of knowledge on a topic with which you were nearly consumed. Don’t repeat information from Part III. […]

Part I–What I Already Know About My Topic 
Here is where you write at least one or two paragraphs (or longer as you study your motives), discussing what knowledge, experience, or background you already have about your topic, BEFORE having done any research on it. 
 
Part II–What I Want to Find Out 
You put down one or two paragraphs’ (or more) worth of questions about your topic, questions you want badly, even desperately, to have answered. These questions will lead you to those sources that will answer your questions. These questions are the passionate, fiery fuel that guide you through the morass of library work, interviews, lengthy bus rides or freeways drives, etc. You may use “I” and your opinion.
How are high technology devices affecting students ability to focus
Part III–The Search 
You’ll read at least 5 magazine/journal articles and 2 books (chapters OK). This is, in essence, the body of your paper. Not only do you report on what others have said about your topic, you must document that carefully using MLA style. The “I” in I-Search means that you must write in the first person, and you must be an interactive, reactive participant in the I-Search writing process. This part of the paper is the bulk of your paper and should be the longest. There are no length limits, but you should have a minimum of 6 pages. Every paragraph in Part III needs at least one citation. You can NOT  use your opinion in this section.
 
Part IV–What I Learned 
This is where you reflect upon the entire search experience, not only what you got out of it and not only what you’ve learned (outside of the research), but how this search has changed your life. It can be as short as one to two paragraphs in length or as long as you feel you need, and summarizes your quest for the holy grail of knowledge on a topic with which you were nearly consumed. Don’t repeat information from Part III.
 
* Works Cited
Here you will list, in ABC order, the sources you’ve consulted for your paper. All sources must be listed here following the MLA documentation method. All sources must be mentioned in the paper. Give in-text citations as well as the Works Cited page. 
 
* Presentation
Hand in your presentation visuals in some electronic form, preferably through Canvas.
 
Points:
– Take a look at the sample I-Search paper
– Hand in your topic sheet on time
– Start thinking NOW who you might interview for your topic
– Remember to write your paper in this format (with part I, Part II, etc.)
– Keep in mind that you can use “I”
– Keep in mind that there are no opinions. This is a research paper. You tell what you found out. That’s all. Opinions are for your essays.
– Keep in mind that everything in Part III must be cited because this is what you found out in your research. If you put in something you already knew, then it is in the wrong place – it belongs in Part I
– In your first draft, keep the Four Parts as in the Sample Paper, but in the final draft, take them out

CLICK HERE TO GET THE SOLUTION!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *